Razer is making a phone for gamers (probably)


A few months ago, Razer made the surprising move of buying Nextbit, a small company that had just entered the market with a cloud-oriented phone. If it wasn’t already clear then that Razer intended to make a smartphone, a report by Bloomberg corroborates the suspicion. According to “people familiar with the matter,” the company is shooting for a $3-5 billion valuation on a Hong Kong IPO in order to help fund the smartphone. This theoretical device would be aimed at Razer’s hardcore gaming audience, whatever that means. I, for one, would be curious to see a Razer phone. The company…

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Scientists are now using Wi-Fi to read human emotions


Scientists at MIT are using Wi-Fi and AI to determine your emotional state. They’ve created an algorithm that can detect and measure individual heartbeats by bouncing RF signals off of people. An RF emitter coupled with the algorithm works in the same way as an electrocardiogram (EKG/ECG), without requiring any leads be attached to a person. This is accomplished using the same technology that we currently have in our home routers. The remarkable part is the machine-learning that goes into what the scientists are calling EQ Radio. The information the AI receives has to be processed differently than a standard…

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How Google Fiber won by failing


Google Fiber, for all intents and purposes, was a failure. For all the promise of Gigabit speeds nationwide, Google managed just to install its super fast internet in just 20 cities while burning through billions of dollars and numerous staffers — including two CEOs in just nine months. But even in failure, few things are black and white. Google may have failed as an ISP, but we’ve all won — including Google. From day one, journalists speculated Fiber was less about competing with established ISPs like Comcast and AT&T, and instead rubbing their nose in failure. Failure is an accurate…

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Microsoft uses domain names in legal battle against Russian hackers


Microsoft is taking down suspected Russian hackers using American trademark law, with a year-long legal battle tentatively drawing to a close this week. Microsoft filed suit against the hackers last year for computer intrusion and infringing on its trademarks. It alleged the John Does responsible, through an operation called “Strontium,” have broken into Microsoft accounts and stolen info from Microsoft customers. A classic Law & Order legal battle, this is not. The hackers aren’t facing down Microsoft’s lawyers in person — it’s still not known who they are or where they’re operating from. The legal documents describe the defendants as a “sophisticated…

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Scientists create a holographic microscope to find aliens


Researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) are creating a new microscope technology they hope will empirically determine if life exists beyond our planet. The device is called a Digital Holographic Microscope and it’s designed to find microbes in space. The last time NASA actively searched for life outside of Earth was with the Viking space program in 1976. Since then, there hasn’t been any clear consensus in the scientific community on how best to continue the search. Sure, we’ve spent time and money searching for water on other planets – figuring that was the likeliest place we’d find…

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I tried replacing my mouse with a Wacom tablet, and it almost stuck


Wacom tablets are normally associated with digital artists and illustrators. I am neither of those, but when Wacom sent me their new Intuos Pro M, I decided to give it a go anyway. I figured many artists used drawing tablets and their primary mousing device, so I wanted to see if it could replace my trusty Logitech G900 on the desktop. Almost. While I’ve rarely used drawing tablets, I’m no stranger to the stylus; I’ve been using tablet PCs since Vista. After I built myself a desktop in December, I missed the freedom and flexibility that came with the stylus…

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Lyft’s self-driving cars are invading Boston


Lyft announced today it was opening its own self-driving car division in Palo Alto called Level 5, and its first cars will hit the streets of Boston by the end of this year. According to David Vincent, Lyft’s head of autonomy, self-driving cars won’t replace its drivers: When a passenger requests a ride that a self-driving car can complete, we may send one to complete the trip. If that person needs to go somewhere self-driving cars are unable to navigate, or their needs call for a different level of service, they will have a driver. After the Boston test, the…

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How data is helping to upgrade healthcare and pharma innovation


Healthcare, life sciences, and pharmaceutical research are hot-button issues in the U.S. and abroad. As the debate surrounding federal health care plans rages in Washington D.C., a quiet undercurrent is forming to help make a change in the industry regardless of political opinion, and outside its influence. That shift is being led by a growing number of companies in the life sciences arena that are working to upset the status quo by turning data into actionable insights that can help benefit every aspect of healthcare. Over 80% of healthcare data is unstructured. Unstructured data, simply put, is any information that…

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Facebook’s new patent hints at a modular smartphone


Facebook yesterday filed a patent detailing plans for a modular smart device. The patent shows off a design that would allow consumers to mix and match different hardware components compatible with a base frame. Information gleaned from the patent doesn’t make it clear whether this device is meant to be a smart phone or not. It’s possible, based on images in the document, that it could also be a smart-home speaker like Amazon’s Alexa. This isn’t the first time we’ve seen a modular device concept, and this patent certainly isn’t indicating that Facebook is going to develop and manufacture the…

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Become a better writer immediately with Ginger Page Premium – now 90% off


Writing has never been easy. But in the age of emojis, abbreviations, microscopically tiny keys and autocorrect, it’s never been more painful to wade through paragraphs clogged with typos, grammatical errors and prose that would make your 5th grade English teacher smack her forehead in frustration. Thankfully, Ginger Page Premium stands ready to take back your sanity from horrendous communication. Make sure you’re part of the solution and not the problem with this app that’ll make you a better writer, on sale now for $69.99, a 90 percent savings, from TNW Deals. With a rating of 4.5 out of 5 among more than…

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